Times are Changing…

Logo 600 x 600Welcome back, Drone Law Nation! Today we have a bonus episode with some thank-you’s, reflection, and announcements of changes.

First, thank you all for an amazing 2016. We launched the Drone Law Course and the State Drone Law Book while continuing to introduce you to the people and ideas making the drone industry “go.”

We look forward to doing more in 2017, but to do that consistently we are changing the schedule.

Starting this month, the Drone Law Today Podcast will publish every-other-week. Our next episode will be on January 23.

Thank you for going on this journey with us since we started in 2015. We look forward to an awesome 2017, with more great things to share.

We have some great things coming out in 2017. Make sure you don’t miss a thing by getting on the email list. You can join it by downloading the Drone Revolution and State Drone Law books, or by submitting a question on our Question Collector.

Until next time, Drone Law Nation – Keep On Flying.

Links for you:

Drone Law Today YouTube Channel

Drone Law Course

Download Link to the Drone Revolution and State Drone Law books

Drone Law Today Question Collector

 

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Listen on YouTube

Listen in your browser

Nothing in this podcast is legal advice! Please don’t make legal decisions for yourself or your business before consulting counsel of your choice.

Learn more about our law firm, Ausley McMullen, at www.ausley.com.

Keep on flying,

Steve

Police Drones & the 4th Amendment Part 10: Predicting the Future

Logo 600 x 600Welcome back, Drone Law Nation! Today we are back with the tenth and final part of our series on the Constitutional issues raised when police use drones.

Today we’re talking about the future. Through the lens of legal scholars who have written about these issues, we will take a look at what future cases might look like.

Thanks for coming along for the ride. Listen in for more about what the future might be.

Links for you:

Police Drones Part 1

Police Drones Part 2

Police Drones Part 3

Police Drones Part 4

Police Drones Part 5

Police Drones Part 6

Police Drones Part 7

Police Drones Part 8

Police Drones Part 9

U.S. Constitution: Amendment 4

Villasenor: Observations from Above

Farber: Eyes in the Sky

Ohm: Fourth Amendment in a World Without Privacy

Kerr: Equilibrium Adjustment Theory

 

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Nothing in this podcast is legal advice! Please don’t make legal decisions for yourself or your business before consulting counsel of your choice.

Learn more about our law firm, Ausley McMullen, at www.ausley.com.

Keep on flying,

Steve

Announcing the State Drone Law Book!

cropped-logo-2048px.jpgDrone Law Nation, you heard it here first: the Ausley McMullen Law Firm has created the first ever book addressing the State Drone Laws in place around the United States.

Click the link to get your copy of State Drone Law: State Laws and Regulations on Unmanned Aircraft Systems!

Joining me to announce the book is Richard Doran, the former Attorney General of Florida and my mentor in all things “drone law.”

Richard and I have worked together for years in advising Government entities and private companies on issues related to drone law.

The State Drone Law Book is the culmination of years of effort to understand the interaction between federal and state law on the drone industry. We worked this summer to compile the statutes and regulations impacting drones all across the country, and to translate that information in an easy-to-understand book.

This edition, officially announced to the Drone Law Today Email List on December 30, 2016, is our “first shot” at addressing these issues in a comprehensive way. We intend to update this book annually, and to expand it to discuss the cases on drones that are winding their way through the courts.

Thank you once again for being part of the Drone Revolution.

Let’s work together to make the future awesome.

Links for you:

State Drone Law: State Laws and Regulations on Unmanned Aircraft Systems

Richard Doran’s profile

Ausley.com

DroneLawyers.com

Our brief in Huerta v. Pirker

 

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Nothing in this podcast is legal advice! Please don’t make legal decisions for yourself or your business before consulting counsel of your choice.

Keep on flying,

Steve

Police Drones & the 4th Amendment, Part 9: State v. Davis

Logo 600 x 600Welcome back, Drone Law Nation! Today we are back with Part 9 of our series on the Constitutional issues raised when police use drones.

Today we’re talking about State v. Davis, a case from the Supreme Court of New Mexico addressing aerial surveillance under the Fourth Amendment and state law. This case gets into the “nitty gritty” of how to examine helicopter surveillance under federal precedent, and how to “distinguish” your case from precedent that you want to “get away” from. This case came from helicopter surveillance that led to a marijuana seizure – just like Riley. But the New Mexico Supreme Court went a different direction. And it mentioned how it might address drones in a different case.

Listen in for more about what the future might be.

Links for you:

Police Drones Part 1

Police Drones Part 2

Police Drones Part 3

Police Drones Part 4

Police Drones Part 5

Police Drones Part 6

Police Drones Part 7

Police Drones Part 8

State v. Davis

U.S. Constitution: Amendment 4

Emil Kiehne’s Blog on State v. Davis

 

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Follow @DroneLawToday on Twitter!

What questions do you have about Drone Law? Click here to let us know!

 Nothing in this podcast is legal advice! Please don’t make legal decisions for yourself or your business before consulting counsel of your choice.

Download your FREE copy of “The Drone Revolution: How Robotic Aviation Will Change the World,” right here: CLICK FOR BOOK!

Learn more about our law firm, Ausley McMullen, at www.ausley.com.

Keep on flying,

Steve

Police Drones & the 4th Amendment, Part 8: Kyllo v. U.S.

cropped-logo-2048px.jpgWelcome back, Drone Law Nation! Today we are back with Part 8 of our series on the Constitutional issues raised when police use drones.

Today we’re talking about Kyllo v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court case that tells us when “new technology” may infringe on our Fourth Amendment rights. The “new tech” angle is critical here – the first court that considers police searches with a drone under the Fourth Amendment will have to read Kyllo together with Ciraolo, Dow Chemical, and Florida v. Riley to come up with its answer. This means that you should understand these cases, Drone Law Nation, as it could be your product (or client) that makes the law.

Listen in for more about what the future might be.

Links for you:

Police Drones Part 1

Police Drones Part 2

Police Drones Part 3

Police Drones Part 4

Police Drones Part 5

Police Drones Part 6

Police Drones Part 7

Kyllo v. U.S.

U.S. Constitution: Amendment 4

 

Listen in iTunes

Listen in Stitcher

 

Listen on YouTube

Listen in your browser

 

Follow @DroneLawToday on Twitter!

What questions do you have about Drone Law? Click here to let us know!

 Nothing in this podcast is legal advice! Please don’t make legal decisions for yourself or your business before consulting counsel of your choice.

Download your FREE copy of “The Drone Revolution: How Robotic Aviation Will Change the World,” right here: CLICK FOR BOOK!

Learn more about our law firm, Ausley McMullen, at www.ausley.com.

Keep on flying,

Steve

Police Drones & the 4th Amendment – Part 7: Florida v. Riley

Logo 600 x 600Welcome back, Drone Law Nation! Today we are back with Part 7 of our series on the Constitutional issues raised when police use drones.

Our talk today hits the third of our three “aerial surveillance” cases, Florida v. Riley. This case deals with naked-eye surveillance of marijuana plants inside a greenhouse through an open panel in the greenhouse roof. The surveillance took place from a helicopter hovering at 400 feet above the ground.

Was this a “search” that requires a warrant under the Fourth Amendment? The Florida Supreme Court said “yes,” but the U.S. Supreme Court said “no.” The reasons that the U.S. Supreme Court reached that conclusion may be important for future “police drone” cases.

Listen in for more about what the future might be.

Links for you:

Police Drones Part 1

Police Drones Part 2

Police Drones Part 3

Police Drones Part 4

Police Drones Part 5

Police Drones Part 6

Florida v. Riley

U.S. Constitution: Amendment 4

 

Listen in iTunes

Listen in Stitcher

Listen on YouTube

Listen in your browser

 

Follow @DroneLawToday on Twitter!

What questions do you have about Drone Law? Click here to let us know!

Nothing in this podcast is legal advice! Please don’t make legal decisions for yourself or your business before consulting counsel of your choice.

Download your FREE copy of “The Drone Revolution: How Robotic Aviation Will Change the World,” right here: CLICK FOR BOOK!

Learn more about our law firm, Ausley McMullen, at www.ausley.com.

Keep on flying,

Steve

What Technology Wants

Logo 600 x 600What Technology Wants is an important book. Its author, Kevin Kelly, is a sage.

Mr. Kelly is the rarest of authors: a futurist that is consistently right, consistently insightful, and willing to share the wildest reaches of his mind with the rest of us.

This book is both about what technology is and what it will be. These sound like simple questions, but they aren’t. Not by a long shot.

So what is technology?

It’s everything.

It’s the nest that a bird makes.

It’s the clothes that you’re wearing.

It’s the books on your shelf.

It’s your shelf.

 

Technology is what living things make.

And according to Kevin Kelly?

Technology is as inevitable as evolution itself.

His idea is that technology – in all its forms – is an extension of biological evolution. And that biological evolution is itself an extension of the universe’s coalescence from energy into matter into planets into stars and, ultimately, into the world we live in.

He doesn’t stop there.

He also argues that intelligencesentience – awareness of oneself and the environment and the ability to make choices – is inevitable, too. An example of this is the independent evolution of the type of “charismatic intelligence” we find in ourselves. We are not the only beings with glimmers of this kind of life – it happened independently in whales and birds, too. (Not all birds, of course – sparrows seem quite dumb. But ravens? Ravens know what’s up. So too with dolphins – didn’t Douglas Adams teach us that? I have no comment on the narwhal.)

His arguments are compelling. And they are immediately relevant to the world of drones.

Drones exist within a robotics and computing ecosystem. They are flying robots. They are run with computer “brains.” Any advances in artificial intelligence will find their way into drones.

What does that mean for us? Will the flying robots like us? What does that even mean?

Though the immediate answer is “nobody knows,” we can’t stop there. That’s a cop-out. That’s refusing to think in order to spare your brain the pain.

We can do better than that, Drone Law Nation.

We can run straight at these problems and grapple with them.

We can wrestle with them in the night like Jacob and the angel of God.

And the main problem, to my mind, is not simply the advance of technology and automation as applied to traditionally human endeavors. It’s in the advance of artificial intelligence to the point where it looks, sounds, and feels just like ours.

And then what?

What happens then?

What do we do? What does law look like?

In fact, law itself is a technology – it’s an operating system for society. How will the technology of our legal system adjust to the rise of machines with human-level intelligence? (whatever human-level intelligence might mean).

Kevin Kelly is ultimately optimistic. He views technology as a liberating force, not in the sense of removing perceived “oppression,” but rather in the sense of creating new options for human talents to emerge.

For example, what is Mozart without the piano? What is Van Gogh without cheap oil paint? What is Michelangelo without the tools to carve marble? What is Daft Punk without a synthesizer?

In Kelly’s view, the result of artificial intelligence – whatever that might look like – is a net win for humanity because previously unseen (and unavailable options) will become available to us. What might those be? It’s impossible to say in advance.

In fact, it’s usually impossible to say in advance what the net effect of new technology will be. One example in the book is the development of the “horseless carriage” – the cars we take for granted. From our perspective, it’s obvious that cars mean streets and traffic lights and traffic deaths and suburban houses and interstate highways and whole industries spinning out of our efforts to make the system work.

But at first? None of that was visible. All the people could see back then was the fact that cars could be faster than horses, and that they would not fill the streets with their crap. The “horse manure crisis” was a real environmental concern – people back then were legitimately worried that New York would be buried in dung if the rate of horse usage kept increasing.

The ecosystem that grew up around cars was only obvious after the technology was everywhere.

This will be the case with robots. This will be the case with drones. This will be the case with robots and drones that run on artificial intelligence.

These are the kinds of questions that Kevin Kelly wrestles with in What Technology Wants. He spent years writing this treasure of a book, and this review cannot do it justice.

This book is a necessary read for anyone that wants to understand where the future is going. And I think that’s you, Drone Law Nation.

Read it through and think about what the future might hold. And let us know what that future looks like in your mind.

Who knows? You might have the perspective that unlocks everything.

Share the wisdom. Share the love.

Let’s go win the future.

And while you do that,

Keep On Flying.

Links for you:

What Technology Wants (Kevin Kelly)

The Inevitable (Kevin Kelly)

www.kk.org

James Altucher Podcast interview of Kevin Kelly

Christian Transhumanist Podcast interview of Kevin Kelly

The Turing Test

DLT: Our First “Drones and AI” Episode

DLT: Drones and AI – Interview with Matt Scherer

“The Great Horse Manure Crisis of 1894”

 

Listen in iTunes!

Listen in Stitcher!

Listen on YouTube

Listen in your browser!

 

Follow @DroneLawToday on Twitter!

What questions do you have about Drone Law? Click here to let us know!

 Nothing in this podcast is legal advice! Please don’t make legal decisions for yourself or your business before consulting counsel of your choice.

Download your FREE copy of “The Drone Revolution: How Robotic Aviation Will Change the World,” right here: CLICK FOR BOOK!

Check out the FREE Drone Law Course at www.dronelawtoday.com/course!

Learn more about our law firm, Ausley McMullen, at www.ausley.com.

Keep on flying,

Steve